genocide

The Aftermath of Genocide: Reconciliation and Ignorance

In the sixth, and last, episode of our series on genocide, Again and Again, we discuss the aftermath of genocide. Throughout modern history, nations have taken vastly different approaches when attempting to “move on” from genocides. Some have established reconciliation policies that try to bring justice to the victims, while others have sought to ignore or refrain from admitting culpability. After assessing a number of different cases, we discuss how a nation can best provide justice and fairness to victims in the aftermath of a genocide, while taking steps to mitigate the possibility of future conflicts. 

Stay Involved

There are many ways you can stay informed about modern day genocides and work with those who work to prevent genocides. See below links of some important organizations in the field:

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Take a look at some of our favorite articles that we came across while researching this topic:

Photo Credit: Michael Büker

Preventing Genocide

In the fifth (and penultimate) episode of our series on genocide, Again and Again, we speak with Dr. Matthew Levinger, Research Professor of International Affairs and Director of the National Security Studies Program at the George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs, about genocide prevention. Dr. Levinger provides a framework for analyzing conflicts and exploring solutions to prevent or mitigate conflicts. Dr. Levinger also argues that preventing genocides and mass atrocities is a core national security interest of the United States, necessitating closer attention from US policymakers.

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Take a look at some of our favorite articles that we came across while researching this topic:

Photo Credit: Jordi Bernabeu Farrús

Propagandizing Genocide

In the fourth episode of our series on genocide, Again and Again, we speak with Theogene Rudasingwa, former Chief of Staff to Rwanda President Paul Kagame (2000-2004) and former Ambassador to the United States (1996-1999). Rudasingwa, now living in exile in the United States, speaks about how propaganda was used to intensify divisions within Rwanda and eventually contribute to the Rwandan genocide in 1994. He also provides insights into the aftermath of the genocide and discusses how the suppression of speech can impede ongoing reconciliation efforts in Rwanda.

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Take a look at some of our favorite books and articles that we came across while researching this topic:

Photo Credit: Adam Jones, Ph.D./Global Photo Archive/Wikimedia Commons

Forecasting and Preventing Genocide

In the third episode of our series on genocide, Again and Again, we talk about forecasting with Lawrence Woocher, research director at the Simon-Skjodt Center for the Prevention of Genocide at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Woocher discusses the center’s Early Warning Project, which aims to contribute to the prevention of genocide by using data to forecast where atrocities are most likely to occur. We ask him about the methodology behind the project, its limitations, and its potential for positive impact.

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Take a look at some of the resources that we found interesting while creating this episode:

Lesser-Known Genocides

In the second episode of our series on genocide, Again and Again, we discuss the Circassian and Bangladeshi genocides of the 19th and 20th centuries, where nearly 3.5 million people were collectively murdered. Despite the large numbers of people murdered, we question why these genocides are lost into obscurity. Though cultural proximity and impact to national identities may factor into the popular knowledge of genocides, access to information and competition in journalism can also hinder awareness or action. We also apply these assumptions to the current situation in western China to help decipher what may actually be happening to the Uyghurs.

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Take a look at some of our favorite books and articles that we came across while researching this topic:

The Ten Stages of Genocide

The Ten Stages of Genocide is the first episode of our new series, Again and Again: A Series on Modern-Day Genocide. In this episode, we speak with Dr. Gregory Stanton, Chairman and Founding President of Genocide Watch and Professor at George Mason University, who provides an overview on the “Ten Stages of Genocide.” As Dr. Stanton explains, genocide is a process and all genocides follow a similar path. Having a better knowledge of how genocide manifests can help us identify a genocide’s early stages–and help to prevent genocide before it reaches its violent stages.

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