Podcast

Lesser-Known Genocides

In the second episode of our series on genocide, Again and Again, we discuss the Circassian and Bangladeshi genocides of the 19th and 20th centuries, where nearly 3.5 million people were collectively murdered. Despite the large numbers of people murdered, we question why these genocides are lost into obscurity. Though cultural proximity and impact to national identities may factor into the popular knowledge of genocides, access to information and competition in journalism can also hinder awareness or action. We also apply these assumptions to the current situation in western China to help decipher what may actually be happening to the Uyghurs.

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Take a look at some of our favorite books and articles that we came across while researching this topic:

The Ten Stages of Genocide

The Ten Stages of Genocide is the first episode of our new series, Again and Again: A Series on Modern-Day Genocide. In this episode, we speak with Dr. Gregory Stanton, Chairman and Founding President of Genocide Watch and Professor at George Mason University, who provides an overview on the “Ten Stages of Genocide.” As Dr. Stanton explains, genocide is a process and all genocides follow a similar path. Having a better knowledge of how genocide manifests can help us identify a genocide’s early stages–and help to prevent genocide before it reaches its violent stages.

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Vanishing Fish: A Conversation with Dr. Daniel Pauly

In this episode, we speak with Dr. Daniel Pauly, an award-winning marine biologist at the University of British Colombia. Dr. Pauly speaks with us about his new book, Vanishing Fish: Shifting Baselines and the Future of Global Fisheries, which examines the world’s reserves of fish, commercial fisheries, and the various crises they both face. 

PLEASE NOTE: Minutes 1:35-4:35 are low-quality audio (but don’t worry, it gets better).

Find below a few links related to this episode:

Vanishing Fish: Shifting Baselines and the Future of Global Fisheries

Sea Around Us

Institute of Oceans and Fish at University of British Colombia


Fentanyl

In 2017, the US Department of Health and Human Services declared a public health emergency, often referred to as the opioid crisis. This crisis, which addresses the significantly imbalanced ratio of prescription drugs to the patient population, often overshadows the illicit side of this public emergency. Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid, which straddles the licit and illicit drug trade. Known for its extreme potency, fentanyl’s recent emergence into drug markets is taking the place of popular illegal drugs such as heroin and cocaine.

In today’s episode, we discuss the danger fentanyl poses to users, its supply chain, and its potential impact to the illegal drug trade.

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Take a look at some of our favorite articles that we came across while researching this topic:

Catalonia: A Conversation with Andrew Davis

In this episode, we speak with Andrew Davis of the Catalonia America Council about recent discussions and events surrounding the Catalonia’s relations with Spain. Mr. Davis provides background and context for the ongoing discussions regarding Catalonia’s status with Spain and its relationship with the Spanish government in Madrid. He also provides his thoughts on how to address these complicated issues in the months and years ahead.

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Take a look at some of our favorite articles that we came across while researching this topic:

Spotlight: Estonia

Estonia is a small, high-tech country with democratic values and a capitalist economy. It is also seen as a pivotal player for NATO, especially in cyberspace. In this episode, we will detail Estonia’s background and history, examine its cyber relations with Russia, and discuss how it may impact NATO-Russian relations moving forward.

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Take a look at some of our favorite articles that we came across while researching this topic:

Japan’s Emperor Akihito

Emperor Akihito of Japan is not your traditional emperor. In light of Akihito’s unconventional remarks hinting at a possible desire to abdicate, we spend this episode discussing the emperor’s place in Japanese government and culture. Read More

Invasive Species

As humans have migrated around the world throughout the centuries, they often brought with them various animals and plants to help colonize this planet. Whether intending to establish sources for food in otherwise barren landscapes or unleashing unknown stowaway creatures, humans have unwittingly caused countless invasions by other foreign organisms.

In this episode, we discuss invasive species – from cane toad to cat – and the impact they can have on the new lands they occupy.

Global Maternal Healthcare: A Study in Cultural Competency

In this episode, we speak with two recent graduate students from the Elliott School of International Affairs at the George Washington University here in Washington, DC,  Prerna Balasundaram and Christina Parker, about their ongoing research on cultural competency in maternal global healthcare.

As part of their end-of-degree capstone project, Prerna and Christina are researching how U.S. doctors are being prepared to provide maternal healthcare in foreign countries and in unfamiliar cultures. Today we’ll talk with them to learn more about this topic, including the policy recommendations emerging from their research.

Spotlight: Western Sahara

Western Sahara is a non-self-governing territory on the northwest coast of Africa. Bordered by Morocco, Mauritania, and Algeria, the former Spanish colony has been under dispute since 1976. Ethnic tensions continue to erupt between the native Sahrawi population and Moroccan immigrants, and Morocco maintains a large security presence in the territory.

In this episode, we take a deep dive into Western Sahara’s ongoing conflict and tensions with Morocco before discussing what the future might hold.

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Take a look at some of our favorite articles that we came across while researching this topic:

Photo Credit: NASA