Author

About the Author
John is a graduate student in International Affairs at The George Washington University and serves as the Director of Public Relations for Matters of State. Originally from Central Texas, John earned a B.A. in linguistics from the University of Texas at Austin. He lived in South Korea for nearly three years, teaching English on Jeju Island before studying Korean in Seoul. John’s academic and professional interests are international security and East Asian affairs.

Piracy

Over the past ten years, the world has seen a strong resurgence of piracy, particularly around the Horn of Africa. While international coalitions have largely succeeded in reducing the presence of piracy in that region, the activity has most recently emerged in other locations like Latin America and pockets of Asia. In this episode, we discuss the phenomenon of contemporary piracy and look into ways to alleviate the problem.

Estonia’s E-Residency

As we become more and more dependent on the internet, basic notions such a person’s country of residence are shifting. Estonia is the first country in the world to introduce an eResidency program, which allows people living anywhere in the world the ability to enjoy the same opportunities and services as people who physically live in Estonia.

In this episode, we are joined by Ott Vatter, Managing Director of the Estonia’s eResidency, to talk more about this program.

You can learn more about eResidency at the following links:

A Conversation with EU Ambassador to the US Stavros Lambrinidis

Ambassador Stavros Lambrinidis represents the interests of the European Union in Washington, DC. Ambassador Lambrinidis has held previous positions as the EU Special Representative for Human Rights, the Greek Foreign Minister, and Vice-President of the European Parliament. In our discussion, Ambassador Lambrinidis provides insights into the EU’s relationship with the US, the positive contributions of the EU to European prosperity, and some of the challenges of “dual citizenship” within EU member states.

Dig Deeper

Take a look at some of our favorite articles that we came across while researching this topic:

Made in Sweden: A Conversation with Elisabeth Asbrink

In this episode, we speak with author, Elisabeth Asbrink, who discussed her new book, Made in Sweden. Born and raised in Sweden to English and Hungarian parents, Elisabeth is an internationally renowned journalist, author, and playwright whose work has been translated into 19 languages. In her latest book, Elisabeth examines some of the unknown or forgotten aspects of Swedish culture and history that contribute to the foundation upon which Swedish society and identity are built.

You can find more information about her book here.

Photo Credit: Tove Falk-Olsson

Foreign Remittances

Each year, tens of millions of people migrate all over the world in search of safety, economic prosperity, or a better quality of life. Although split by national boundaries, many families still rely upon migrants for support, resulting in a global flow of money and remittances. In this episode, we will discuss foreign remittances and their impact on the source and recipient countries.

Dig Deeper

Take a look at some of our favorite articles that we came across while researching this topic:

Hawala Houses

Millions of people around the world do not have access to formal banking or means of transferring money across borders. A popular substitute is the “Hawala House,” an efficient and informal alternative money exchange system. In this episode, we explore this ancient form of banking that operates “off the books.” But while Hawala Houses boast a deeply trusted and reliable network of brokers, they also provide a secure way of financing illicit activities such as terrorism.

Dig Deeper

Take a look at some of our favorite articles that we came across while researching this topic:

Photo Credit: Images of Money Flickr Account

Cyber Trafficking

In this episode, we speak with former George Washington University Elliott School of International Affairs graduate students, Mehmil Zia and Rubi Corral Hinojos, about their capstone project focusing on cyber trafficking in Mexico. In particular, they dissect how human traffickers leverage the internet to facilitate human trafficking in Mexico and across the border to the United States. They make recommendations to the governments of the United States and Mexico, as well as tech companies, to help combat this endemic crime.

Lesser-Known Genocides

In the second episode of our series on genocide, Again and Again, we discuss the Circassian and Bangladeshi genocides of the 19th and 20th centuries, where nearly 3.5 million people were collectively murdered. Despite the large numbers of people murdered, we question why these genocides are lost into obscurity. Though cultural proximity and impact to national identities may factor into the popular knowledge of genocides, access to information and competition in journalism can also hinder awareness or action. We also apply these assumptions to the current situation in western China to help decipher what may actually be happening to the Uyghurs.

Dig Deeper

Take a look at some of our favorite books and articles that we came across while researching this topic:

The Ten Stages of Genocide

The Ten Stages of Genocide is the first episode of our new series, Again and Again: A Series on Modern-Day Genocide. In this episode, we speak with Dr. Gregory Stanton, Chairman and Founding President of Genocide Watch and Professor at George Mason University, who provides an overview on the “Ten Stages of Genocide.” As Dr. Stanton explains, genocide is a process and all genocides follow a similar path. Having a better knowledge of how genocide manifests can help us identify a genocide’s early stages–and help to prevent genocide before it reaches its violent stages.

Dig Deeper

Vanishing Fish: A Conversation with Dr. Daniel Pauly

In this episode, we speak with Dr. Daniel Pauly, an award-winning marine biologist at the University of British Colombia. Dr. Pauly speaks with us about his new book, Vanishing Fish: Shifting Baselines and the Future of Global Fisheries, which examines the world’s reserves of fish, commercial fisheries, and the various crises they both face. 

PLEASE NOTE: Minutes 1:35-4:35 are low-quality audio (but don’t worry, it gets better).

Find below a few links related to this episode:

Vanishing Fish: Shifting Baselines and the Future of Global Fisheries

Sea Around Us

Institute of Oceans and Fish at University of British Colombia