Author

About the Author
Grace is the Program Assistant for the Wilson Center’s Africa Program and received her M.A. from the Elliott School of International Affairs at the George Washington University, focusing on international development, conflict resolution, and Sub-Saharan Africa. Grace holds a B.A. in both Global Studies and Political Science from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Previously, she served as the assistant to the President and Executive Vice President of the Henry L. Stimson Center. Grace has traveled to Africa on multiple occasions, most recently to Kenya as a field manager for the health textiles manufacturer Vestergaard-Frandsen.

Uncontacted Peoples

How far do the limits of modern society reach? What is “modern society,” and who belongs to it? What happens when states, organizations, and other members of the “connected world” come into contact with groups that may have little intersection with it? Should these groups be actively protected, thoroughly researched, or simply left alone? Follow along with us as we wrestle with these questions and more during this week’s episode, “Uncontacted Peoples.”

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Sand Mafias

Organized criminal groups that deal in sand are perpetrating violence and undermining governments around the world.
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Unrecognized Countries

What makes a country a country? In this episode, we look at Transnistria, Taiwan, and Somaliland while exploring competing definitions of statehood. Read More

Zoos in Conflict Zones

One of the many stories that go untold in conflict zones is the fate of zoos and their animals. There are concerns for the animals’ safety as well as for humans if predatory animals escape. In this episode, we explore just a few examples of efforts to safeguard zoos during war. Read More

The Nicaragua Canal

The Panama Canal’s opening in 1914 transformed global trade and fostered economic development in Panama. Today, Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega and Chinese financier Wang Jing are trying to emulate its success by constructing a canal through Nicaragua. Read More

Asteroid Mining and the Outer Space Treaty

satellite photo

What do we get out of space?  What rules do countries use to ensure that everyone will “play fair” with the resources that might be out there? Will these rules truly ensure that countries will play fair in space, or will the same political dynamics that divide us here on Earth continue to plague us indefinitely out into the infinite universe? Join us and our special guest, Ken Tanaka, as we ponder these issues and more on today’s episode, “Asteroid Mining and the Outer Space Treaty.”

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Venezuela’s Shift from Chavismo

Note: this episode was originally published in February 2016. Given today’s announcement that Venezuelan president Nicolas Maduro will not allow the main opposition parties to run in next year’s presidential election, we’ve decided to republish this episode to provide context to Venezuela’s political and economic struggles.

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The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam

The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam is one of the most ambitious infrastructure projects in Africa. This episode explores the dam’s potential benefits, development hurdles, and controversy. Read More

NATO’s Evolving Security Environment

Since the start of the Cold War, NATO has been the world’s preeminent military alliance. However, escalating hostilities between NATO and Russia are creating geopolitical challenges for NATO members. In this episode, our friend and guest Rachel Rizzo discusses NATO’s changing security environment. Read More

Spotlight: Guyana

Tucked away in the northeast corner of South America, Guyana is often overshadowed by its larger neighbors Venezuela, Brazil, and Colombia. However, the Guyanese are a diverse and resilient people who play an integral role in the region. Read More